Review: City by Clifford D. Simak

“Once there had been joy, but now there was only sadness, and it was not, he knew, alone the sadness of an empty house; it was the sadness of all else, the sadness of the Earth, the sadness of the failures and the empty triumphs.”
~Clifford D. Simak, City

Plot summary

“Simak’s City is a series of connected stories, a series of legends, myths, and campfire stories told by Dogs about the end of human civilization, centering on the Webster family, who, among their other accomplishments, designed the ships that took Men to the stars and gave Dogs the gift of speech and robots to be their hands.” More on Goodreads

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Books read in 2016

Random book. Photo: Daniel Wehner (CC BY 2.0)
Random book. Photo: Daniel Wehner (CC BY 2.0)
The book year of 2016

2016 was pretty productive in terms of the quantitative as well as qualitative aspect of reading. As of 31 December 2016, I read altogether 52 books, amounting to over 10,000 pages. Below you’ll find a listing of some of the novels, short stories and other books I read. Most of the non-fictional works that I had the pleasure of reading are not included.

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Review: The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury

“It was a hard rain, a perpetual rain, a sweating and steaming rain; it was a mizzle, a downpour, a fountain, a whipping in the eyes, an undertow at the ankles; it was a rain to drown all rains and the memory of rains.”
~Ray Bradbury, The Illustrated Man

Plot summary

“The Illustrated Man is classic Bradbury – a collection of tales that breathe and move, animated by sharp, intaken breath and flexing muscle. Here are eighteen startling visions of humankind’s destiny, unfolding across a canvas of decorated skin – visions as keen as the tattooist’s needle and as colorful as the inks that indelibly stain the body.

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My Top 30 Books

“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”
Mark Twain, Following the Equator: A Journey Around the World

On the topic of books, I never seem to have gotten over Albert Camus’ L’Étranger/The Stranger/The Outsider (1942). It was one of the first books that made me really think about what it means to be a human. The book was a compulsory read during those educating years at high school. All the signs were there to hate the book – all things mandatory made one automatically to be hesitant and mostly skeptical. But luckily there are exceptions to the rule.

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